The Greenpeace ship Arctic Sunrise in Liefdefjorden, Svalbard; before departure for the fraim Strait.
 Ice Pilot Bob Graham looks out onto the sea ice from the bridge of the Arctic Sunrise.
 Image taken from the bow of the Greenpeace ship, Arctic Sunrise as she makes her way through the Fram Strait sea ice.
 Cambridge University scientist, Till Wagner takes an ice core sample.
 Cambridge University ice scientist Nick Toberg saws a ice core sample into pieces.
 Nick Toberg, a scientist from Cambridge University with a ice core sample. These samples will later be used to test the core's salinity - and therefore the age of the ice floe; Arctic sea ice has already disappeared by 75% in the last 30 years.
 Scientists from the Woods Hole Institute of Oceanographic Research, Cambridge University and 3D experts ScanLAB at work on an Arctic ice floe.
 Cambridge University scientist Nick Toberg (l) drills holes, while John Fletcher and Professor Peter Wadhams follow behind to measure sea ice thickness on a Fram Strait ice floe.
 Scientist John Fletcher from Cambridge University measures the thickness of an ice floe.
 Portrait of Peter Wadhams, Professor of Ocean Physics at Cambridge University on a Fram Strait ice floe.
 Scientist John Fletcher from Cambridge University collects sea ice thickness measurements.
 Cambridge University scientists John Fletcher (l) and Nick Toberg cross an ice floe melt pool.
 Polar bear on Arctic sea ice, seen from the deck of the Arctic Sunrise.
 Hu Haiquan uses binoculars to look at the sea ice from the bridge of the Arctic Sunrise.
 ScanLAB'sWill Trossell at work on an ice floe. Known as a "Stamukha" due to its deep pressure ridges, this floe also spent time grounded off Siberia.
 ScanLAB's Joseph Severn uses a 'total station' to measure distances and angles between certain points, like the reference spheres used on the ice floe.
 Will Trossell with reference spheres which will later be used to enable ScanLAB to create a 3D point cloud of the ice floe.
 ScanLAB's Will Trossell protects his phase scanner from a rain shower whilst at work on an ice floe.   The data collected by ScanLAB will later be used to create a 3D Point Cloud (or architectural drawing) of the ice floe, made up of thousands of co-ordinated points
 A view of Arctic sea ice.
 John Kemp (r) of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, Till Wagner and Professor Peter Wadhams from Cambridge University use an ice drill to place a transponder below the ice floe. The transponder will send out acoustic pulses to give the range and position of the AUV (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle).
 Hanu Singh (from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute) and deckhand Eric Bangad launch an AUV (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle). The AUV is an unmanned robot designed to conduct dangerous underwater missions of social relevance, such as the underside of the Arctic sea ice.
 The launch of an AUV (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) belonging to the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, from the Arctic Sunrise.
 Professor Hanu Singh (r) and Jeff Anderson (l) of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, look at data collected by the AUV (Autonomous Underwater Vehicle) aboard the Greenpeace ship, Arctic Sunrise. The Woods Hole AUV is an unmanned robot designed to conduct dangerous underwater missions of social relevance,such as the underside of the Arctic sea ice.
 Rainbow over the Fram Strait sea ice, seen from the deck of the Arctic Sunrise.
prev / next